Go to navigation Go to content
Phone: (801) 756-0765
Mountain West Foot & Ankle Institute Mountain West Foot & Ankle Institute
Call Us (801) 756-0765
Fax (801) 756-1405

Another Clue Nutrition Can Help Neuropathy

Brandt R Gibson, DPM
Podiatrist, Neuropathy Doctor, Father of 11 and Founder of Mountain West Foot & Ankle Institute
Comments (0)

For years individuals were told that nerves were malfunctioning and often couldn't be given a reason.  On March 27, 2013, the issue of the Journal of Neuroscience discussed new findings in Schwann Cells, specifically a protein LRP1.  Schwann cells are specialized glial support cells that produce the necessary substances to line the nerves to improve signal speed and other support proteins to help the nerve functioning.  In this interaction, LRP1 plays a key role:

"LRP1 helps mediate normal interactions between Schwann cells and axons and, when peripheral nerves have been injured, plays a critical role in regulating the steps that lead to eventual nerve regeneration," said Wendy Campana, PhD associate professor in UC San Diego's Department of Anesthesiology. "When LRP1 is deficient, defects and problems become worse. They may go from acute to chronic, with increasing levels of pain."

Therefore the failure of the LRP1 protein to form correctly can be a large problem for those suffering with peripheral neuropathy.  One of the theories for neuropathy explains these findings well.  Due to environmental or nutritional stresses (producing a product called Reactive Oxygen Substances) the cells, especially the mitochondria of these cells start to malfunction.  As they malfunction, DNA gets messed up and proteins are formed incorrectly.  These proteins then fail to perform their necessary function.  The solution is using nutritional management including high quality foods and nutritional supplements, especially antioxidants like Vitamin E and Alpha Lipoic Acid.  Some of the vitamin B options may also support the improvement of mitochondrial function and allow removal of the ROS stressors to the Schwann cell.  Until another option is found to possibly replace substance LRP1, this justifies (again) the use of these techniques to treat your neuropathic pain.

Be the first to comment!

Post a Comment

To reply to this message, enter your reply in the box labeled "Message", hit "Post Message."

Name:*

Email:* (will not be published)

Message:*

Notify me of follow-up comments via email.

Agree Privacy Policy *